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Actions

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Avo actions allow you to perform specific tasks on one or more of your records.

For example, you might want to mark a user as active/inactive and optionally send a message that may be customized by the person that wants to run the action.

Once you attach an action to a resource using the action method inside the actions method, it will appear in the Actions dropdown. By default, actions appear on the Index, Show, and Edit views. Versions previous to 2.9 would only display the actions on the Index and Show views.

Actions dropdown

INFO

Since version 2.13.0 you may use the customizable controls feature to show the actions outside the dropdown.

Creating an action

To generate an action configuration file, run bin/rails generate avo:action toggle_active.

ruby
# app/avo/actions/toggle_active.rb

class Avo::Actions::ToggleActive < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Toggle Active"
  # self.visible = -> do
  #   true
  # end

  # def fields
  #   # Add Action fields here
  # end

  def handle(query:, fields:, current_user:, resource:, **args)
    query.each do |record|
      # Do something with your records.
    end
  end
end

Registering an action

To add the action to a resource, declare it inside the actions method as follows:

ruby
class Avo::Resources::User < Avo::BaseResource
  self.title = :name

  def fields
    field :id, as: :id
  end

  def actions
    action Avo::Actions::ToggleActive
  end
end

The fields method (optional)

You may add fields to the action just as you do it in a resource. Adding fields is optional.

WARNING

The belongs_to field will only work on the Show and Edit page of a record. It won't work on the Index page of a resource.

Read more on why here.

ruby
def fields
  field :notify_user, as: :boolean
  field :message, as: :textarea, default: 'Your account has been marked as inactive.'
end

Files authorization

If you're using the file field on an action and attach it to a resource that's using the authorization feature, please ensure you have the upload_{FIELD_ID}? policy method returning true. Otherwise, the file input might be hidden.

More about this on the authorization page.

Actions

The handle method

This is where the magic happens. This method contains your action logic.

The handle method receives the following arguments:

  • query and records: both names can be used interchangeably. Single records are automatically wrapped in an array.
  • fields
  • current_user
  • resource
ruby
def handle(query:, fields:, current_user:, resource:, **args)
  # Do something
end

Passing Params to the Action Show Page

When navigation to an action from a resource Index or Show views, it's sometimes useful to pass parameters to an action.

One particular example is when you'd like to populate a field in that action with some particular value based on that param.

ruby
class Action
  def fields
    field :some_field, as: :hidden, default: -> { if previous_param == yes ? :yes : :no}
  end
end

Consider the following scenario:

  1. Navigate to https://main.avodemo.com/avo/resources/users.
  2. Add the parameter hey=ya to the URL: https://main.avodemo.com/avo/resources/users?hey=ya
  3. Attempt to run the dummy action.
  4. After triggering the action, verify that you can access the hey parameter.
  5. Ensure that the retrieved value of the hey parameter is ya.

Implementation

To achieve this, we'll reference the request.referer object and extract parameters from the URL. Here is how to do it:

ruby
class Action
  def fields
    # Accessing the parameters passed from the parent view
    field :some_field, as: :hidden, default: -> {
      # Parsing the request referer to extract parameters
      parent_params = URI.parse(request.referer).query.split("&").map { |param| param.split("=")}.to_h.with_indifferent_access
      # Checking if the `hei` parameter equals `ya`
      if parent_params[:hey] == 'ya'
        :yes
      else
        :no
      end
    }
  end
end

Parse the request.referer to extract parameters using URI.parse. Split the query string into key-value pairs and convert it into a hash. Check if the hey parameter equals ya, and set the default value of some_field accordingly.

Action responses

After an action runs, you may use several methods to respond to the user. For example, you may respond with just a message or with a message and an action.

The default response is to reload the page and show the Action ran successfully message.

Message responses

Four message response methods are at your disposal: succeed, error, warn, and inform. These render green, red, orange, and blue alerts.

ruby
def handle(**args)
  # Demo handle action

  succeed "Success response ✌️"
  warn "Warning response ✌️"
  inform "Info response ✌️"
  error "Error response ✌️"
end
Avo alert responses

Run actions silently

You may want to run an action and show no notification when it's done. That is useful for redirect scenarios. You can use the silent response for that.

ruby
def handle(**args)
  # Demo handle action

  redirect_to "/admin/some-tool"
  silent
end

Response types

After you notify the user about what happened through a message, you may want to execute an action like reload (default action) or redirect_to. You may use message and action responses together.

ruby
def handle(query:, **args)
  query.each do |record|
    if record.admin?
      error "Can't mark inactive! The user is an admin."
    else
      record.update active: false

      succeed "Done! User marked as inactive!"
    end
  end

  reload
end

The available action responses are:

reload

When you use reload, a full-page reload will be triggered.

ruby
def handle(query:, **args)
  query.each do |project|
    project.update active: false
  end

  succeed 'Done!'
  reload
end

redirect_to

redirect_to will execute a redirect to a new path of your app. It accept allow_other_host, status and any other arguments.

Example: redirect_to path, allow_other_host: true, status: 303

ruby
def handle(query:, **args)
  query.each do |project|
    project.update active: false
  end

  succeed 'Done!'
  redirect_to avo.resources_users_path
end

turbo

There are times when you don't want to perform the actions with Turbo. In such cases, turbo should be set to false.

download

download will start a file download to your specified path and filename.

You need to set may_download_file to true for the download response to work like below. That's required because we can't respond with a file download (send_data) when making a Turbo request.

If you find another way, please let us know 😅.

ruby
class Avo::Actions::DownloadFile < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Download file"
  self.may_download_file = true

def handle(query:, **args)
    filename = "projects.csv"
    report_data = []

    query.each do |project|
      report_data << project.generate_report_data
    end

    succeed 'Done!'

    if report_data.present? and filename.present?
      download report_data, filename
    end
  end
end
ruby
class Avo::Resources::Project < Avo::BaseResource
  def fields
    # fields here
  end

  def actions
    action Avo::Actions::DownloadFile
  end
end

keep_modal_open

There might be situations where you want to run an action and if it fails, respond back to the user with some feedback but still keep it open with the inputs filled in.

keep_modal_open will tell Avo to keep the modal open.

ruby
class Avo::Actions::KeepModalOpenAction < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Keep Modal Open"
  self.standalone = true

  def fields
    field :name, as: :text
    field :birthday, as: :date
  end

  def handle(fields:, **args)
    User.create fields
    succeed "All good ✌️"
  rescue => error
    error "Something happened: #{error.message}"
    keep_modal_open
  end
end

close_modal

Since v3.3.0

This type of response becomes useful when you are working with a form and need to execute an action without redirecting, ensuring that the form remains filled as it is.

close_modal will flash all the messages gathered by action responses and will close the modal using turbo streams keeping the page still.

ruby
class Avo::Actions::CloseModal < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Close modal"
  self.standalone = true
  self.visible = -> {
    true
  }

  def handle(**args)
    # do_something_here
    succeed "Modal closed!!"
    close_modal
  end
end

Since v3.4.2

You may want to redirect to another action. Here's an example of how to create a multi-step process, passing arguments from one action to another. In this example the initial action prompts the user to select the fields they wish to update, and in the subsequent action, the chosen fields will be accessible for updating.

ruby
class Avo::Actions::City::PreUpdate < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Update"

  def fields
    field :name, as: :boolean
    field :population, as: :boolean
  end

  def handle(query:, fields:, **args)
    navigate_to_action Avo::Actions::City::Update,
      arguments: {
        cities: query.map(&:id),
        render_name: fields[:name],
        render_population: fields[:population]
      }
  end
end
ruby
class Avo::Actions::City::Update < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Update"
  self.visible = -> { false }

  def fields
    field :name, as: :text if arguments[:render_name]
    field :population, as: :number if arguments[:render_population]
  end

  def handle(fields:, **args)
    City.find(arguments[:cities]).each do |city|
      city.update! fields
    end

    succeed "City updated!"
  end
end

You can see this multi-step process in action by visiting the avodemo. Select one of the records, click on the "Update" action, choose the fields to update, and then proceed to update the selected fields in the subsequent action.

Customization

ruby
class Avo::Actions::TogglePublished < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = 'Mark inactive'
  self.message = 'Are you sure you want to mark this user as inactive?'
  self.confirm_button_label = 'Mark inactive'
  self.cancel_button_label = 'Not yet'
  self.no_confirmation = true
end

Callable options

Both name and message allow a block. Within this block, you gain access to all attributes of Avo::ExecutionContext along with the record (if on show view), resource, arguments and view.

Customize the name

ruby
class Avo::Actions::ReleaseFish < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = -> { "Release #{record.name}?" }
  self.message = -> { "Are you sure you want to release the #{record.name}?" }
end

Customize the buttons

You may customize the labels for the action buttons using confirm_button_label and cancel_button_label.

Avo button labels

No confirmation actions

You will be prompted by a confirmation modal when you run an action. If you don't want to show the confirmation modal, pass in the self.no_confirmation = true class attribute. That will execute the action without showing the modal at all.

Standalone actions

You may need to run actions that are not necessarily tied to a model. Standalone actions help you do just that. Add self.standalone to an existing action or generate a new one using the --standalone option (bin/rails generate avo:action global_action --standalone).

ruby
class Avo::Actions::DummyAction < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Dummy action"
  self.standalone = true

  def handle(query:, fields:, current_user:, resource:, **args)
    # Do something here

    succeed 'Yup'
  end
end

Actions visibility

You may want to hide specific actions on screens, like a standalone action on the Show screen. You can do that using the self.visible attribute.

ruby
class Avo::Actions::DummyAction < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Dummy action"
  self.standalone = true
  self.visible = -> { view == :index }

  def handle(query:, fields:, current_user:, resource:, **args)
    # Do something here

    succeed 'Yup'
  end
end

By default, actions are visible on the Index, Show, and Edit views, but you can enable them on the New screen, too (from version 2.9.0).

ruby
self.visible = -> { view == :new }

# Or use this if you want them to be visible on any view
self.visible = -> { true }

Inside the visible block you can access the following variables:

ruby
  self.visible = -> do
    #   You have access to:
    #   block
    #   context
    #   current_user
    #   params
    #   parent_resource (can access the parent_record by parent_resource.record)
    #   resource (can access the record by resource.record)
    #   view
    #   view_context
  end

Actions authorization

WARNING

Using the Pundit policies, you can restrict access to actions using the act_on? method. If you think you should see an action on a resource and you don't, please check the policy method.

More info here

The self.authorize attribute in action classes is handy when you need to manage authorization for actions. This attribute accepts either a boolean or a proc, allowing the incorporation of custom logic. Within this block, you gain access to all attributes of Avo::ExecutionContext along with the action, resource, and view.

If an action is unauthorized, it will be hidden. If a bad actor attempts to proceed with the action, the controller will re-evaluate the authorization and block unauthorized requests.

ruby
self.authorize = false

# Or

self.authorize = -> {
  current_user.is_admin?
}

Custom action arguments

Actions can have different behaviors according to their host resource. In order to achieve that, arguments can receive additional arguments as follows:

ruby
class Avo::Resources::Fish < Avo::BaseResource
  self.title = :name

  def fields
    field :id, as: :id
    field :name, as: :text
    field :user, as: :belongs_to
    field :type, as: :text, hide_on: :forms
  end

  def actions
    action DummyAction, arguments: {
      special_message: true
    }

    # Or as a proc

    action DummyAction, arguments: -> do
      {
        special_message: resource.view.index? && current_user.is_admin?
      }
    end
  end
end

Now, the arguments can be accessed inside Avo::Actions::DummyAction handle method and on the visible block!

ruby
class Avo::Actions::DummyAction < Avo::BaseAction
  self.name = "Dummy action"
  self.standalone = true
  self.visible = -> do
    arguments[:special_message]
  end

  def handle(**args)
    if arguments[:special_message]
      succeed "I love 🥑"
    else
      succeed "Success response ✌️"
    end
  end
end

You may want to dynamically generate an action link. For that you need the action class and a resource instance (with or without record hydrated). Call the action's class method link_arguments with the resource instance as argument and it will return the [path, data] that are necessary to create a proper link to a resource.

Let's see an example use case:

ruby
field :name,
  as: :text,
  filterable: true,
  name: "name (click to edit)",
  only_on: :index do

  path, data = Avo::Actions::City::Update.link_arguments(
    resource: resource,
    arguments: {
      cities: Array[resource.record.id],
      render_name: true
    }
  )

  link_to resource.record.name, path, data: data
end
ruby
field :name,
  as: :text,
  filterable: true,
  name: "name (click to edit)",
  only_on: :index do

  arguments = Base64.encode64 Avo::Services::EncryptionService.encrypt(
    message: {
      cities: Array[resource.record.id],
      render_name: true
    },
    purpose: :action_arguments
  )

  path, data = Avo::Actions::City::Update.link_arguments(
    resource: resource,
    arguments: arguments
  )

  link_to resource.record.name, path, data: data
end

actions link demo

StimulusJS

Please follow our extended StimulusJS guides for more information.

Divider Since v3.5.6

Action dividers allow you to organize and separate actions into logical groups, improving the overall layout and usability.

Here's an example of how you can define actions dividers:

ruby
def actions
    action Avo::Actions::ToggleInactive
    action Avo::Actions::ToggleAdmin
    divider
    action Avo::Actions::Sub::DummyAction
    action Avo::Actions::DownloadFile
    divider
    action Avo::Actions::Test::NoConfirmationRedirect
    action Avo::Actions::Test::CloseModal
  end

Icon Since v3.5.6

Action icons allow you to enhance the visual representation of actions. Action icons provide a quick visual cue for users, helping them identify different actions at a glance.

Here's an example of how you can define actions with icons:

ruby
def actions
    action Avo::Actions::ToggleInactive, icon: "heroicons/outline/globe"
    action Avo::Actions::ToggleAdmin
    action Avo::Actions::Sub::DummyAction
    action Avo::Actions::DownloadFile, icon: "heroicons/outline/arrow-left"
    action Avo::Actions::Test::NoConfirmationRedirect
    action Avo::Actions::Test::CloseModal
  end